La Pinsa, this stranger!

The name comes from  the latin word “pinsere”, to stretch, verb that also explains the shape of this fantastic Roman product that represents an oval shaped pizza that is easily digestible due to its lighter dough and the presence of cold water.

Therefore when looking at it closely it is nothing but a flatbread that was born before the pizza, during the Roman times to be exact, from the union of different cereals worked with water, salt, and aromatic herbs that allowed the farmers the use of their raw materials in different ways, substantial but not heavy.

The classic recipe uses a mix of different flours, soft grain, soy and rice mixed strictly with cold water (in the case of the pinsa, water represents 75-80% of the dough!) and yeast in very low quantities; the dough is left to rise at least 24 hours up to 150 hours. Yes, you understood right: the dough arrives to a levitation of 150 hours, which means the pinsa becomes aromatic, digestible, and hypocaloric.

Ingredients for about 6 Roman pinsas

800 grams of soft grain flour
150 grams of rice flour
50 grams of soy flour
1/2 packet of dry yeast
20 grams of salt
10 grams of extravirgin olive oil
1 liter of refrigerated cold water in order to get to 80% hydration

With your hands, mix the three flours and then add the yeast and mix by hand or with the electric mixer.

Add 80% of the cold water and mix for about 3-4 minutes.

Add the salt to the mix and mix again, then add the oil and keep mixing.

Add the remaining cold water, and mix for at least another 5 minutes.

Place the dough in a bowl and refrigerate for at least 24 hours (I usually leave it for 48 hours!) then, after levitation, remove the dough from  the fridge and pinch out the amount you will use for each pinsa, let them rest until they have reached double the size (about 3 hours).

Take the dose and extend on an oiled tray and add the toppings. Cook the pinsa in a hot over at 200° for about 1o minutes or until the pinsa becomes crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11200 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2015-10-09 09:28:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-10-09 09:28:40 [post_content] => The name comes from  the latin word “pinsere”, to stretch, verb that also explains the shape of this fantastic Roman product that represents an oval shaped pizza that is easily digestible due to its lighter dough and the presence of cold water. Therefore when looking at it closely it is nothing but a flatbread that was born before the pizza, during the Roman times to be exact, from the union of different cereals worked with water, salt, and aromatic herbs that allowed the farmers the use of their raw materials in different ways, substantial but not heavy. The classic recipe uses a mix of different flours, soft grain, soy and rice mixed strictly with cold water (in the case of the pinsa, water represents 75-80% of the dough!) and yeast in very low quantities; the dough is left to rise at least 24 hours up to 150 hours. Yes, you understood right: the dough arrives to a levitation of 150 hours, which means the pinsa becomes aromatic, digestible, and hypocaloric. Ingredients for about 6 Roman pinsas 800 grams of soft grain flour 150 grams of rice flour 50 grams of soy flour 1/2 packet of dry yeast 20 grams of salt 10 grams of extravirgin olive oil 1 liter of refrigerated cold water in order to get to 80% hydration With your hands, mix the three flours and then add the yeast and mix by hand or with the electric mixer. Add 80% of the cold water and mix for about 3-4 minutes. Add the salt to the mix and mix again, then add the oil and keep mixing. Add the remaining cold water, and mix for at least another 5 minutes. Place the dough in a bowl and refrigerate for at least 24 hours (I usually leave it for 48 hours!) then, after levitation, remove the dough from  the fridge and pinch out the amount you will use for each pinsa, let them rest until they have reached double the size (about 3 hours). Take the dose and extend on an oiled tray and add the toppings. Cook the pinsa in a hot over at 200° for about 1o minutes or until the pinsa becomes crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside. [post_title] => La Pinsa, this stranger! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => la-pinsa-the-stranger [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-10-09 09:29:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-10-09 09:29:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://italianmakersvillage.it/?post_type=portfolio&p=11200 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => portfolio [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Categoria / Category

FOOD , Recipes